Mulch & Edging

Clean, smooth lines provides a finished look and a sense of clarity to an area. This is typically done with edging. Edges define the beds and assist in managing the plants both within and outside the bed.

Mulching is one of the most important ways to protect and maintain healthy landscaped plants, shrubs and flowers. The mulch not only suppresses weeds but also adds a rich, dark color to the edge. It can protect your soil from erosion and adds to the aesthetic appeal of your landscape by making it look more finished.

I can’t emphasize how much both edging and mulch will improve the overall aesthetics of your landscape. Whether you use colored bark mulch or beautiful colored rocks, it will really make your yard pop.

Mulch & Edging Articles

Choosing The Right Mulch

Posted by Landscaping Ideas on 02nd February 2012

For many amateur gardeners there is a huge question mark when things such as the proper mulch or fertilizer come to mind. How do you choose the right mulch for your flowerbed or any other landscaping project you may have in mind and why do you need mulch in the first place? To make things really simple, I will answer the second question first. We need mulch in order to assist in endeavors to conserve soil, use less water, protect your delicate landscaping during winter months, keep plant roots cooler during the summer months, eliminate or at the very least deter weeds, minimize erosion, and countless other things. In other words, you need mulch to help you garden grow.

The Importance Of Mulching

Posted by Landscaping Ideas on 30th January 2012

Mulch in itself is material that is spread out over and around the roots of what you have planted. Two types of mulch are organic and inorganic mulch. Organic mulch includes grass clippings, leaves, bark mulch, newspaper and straw like pine straw. Inorganic mulch includes various types of rocks, stones and gravel. The advantage to using organic mulch is that overtime it breaks down and adds nutrients to the soil, thus making the soil richer. However, because it eventually decomposes, organic mulch will need to be replaced from time to time.